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one of us carries on. we talked about the acronyms each one of us uses. so, we had a real-world -- a real-live exercise that validated some of the things we talk about this morning. but it was extremely beneficial to not only the u.s. navy and marine corps, but to the international community. >> thank you. another hand? >> [inaudible] my experience with the haiti response. in this casey i was working at the deputy principal committee level and working at the white house. but it was really the first opportunity for this administration to work with a very complex response, and then recognizing for us the supported commander was usaid that normally isn't in the emergency response business. so, it was an educational process of how to move forces and yet support usaid and the role of the country team and port au prince. so, it was very informative there. and to back up when we had the first no fooling hurricane that worked its way up the entire gulf coast, the principal committee calls that were generated during the haiti response were then turned around and then bringing all o
thoughts on this particular program and on this mission because it is going to take all of us if the big one happens. so, if i can start with you, vice admiral beaman, if there is anything you'd like to impart, sir. >> actually, i have 37 things i'd like to talk about, but knowing we are the last thing between you and the refreshments in the back, i'll limit it to one. and michelle gedess brought it up earlier today. it's been characterized a couple different ways. vice admiral breckenridge asked if there are any gaps that we've discovered. i would say in a denied environment, it's something we in the military are looking and training to on a daily basis. but in terms of communications, in a denied environment -- and it's not through any particular act that's denying us other than whatever destruction is a resultant of the disaster that hit. and i think that's where we really have work to do. i think next year's table top exercise, if it addressed that or the drill itself went after that, i think we would stand to learn a lot. some of it wouldn't be pleasant, but better to learn it now t
merced and working between us and the national guard, exercising the evacuation of casualties under the control and observation of the department of emergency management, and these are things that we can only really understand through exercise, through training and then figure out where the gaps are and what we need to do to smooth those out. i'll also reference lan wilder if i can. she said something that was pretty revealing. prior to yesterday and getting out on the beach and seeing us, her thinking was just to ride out the disaster. now she feels like she's in a position where she can do some strategic thinking and strategic planning, which is really an obligation for all of us in charge. as captain jones said earlier this morning, we do not know what this is going to look like and it's certainly not going to look like what we anticipate. but having us understand how to react and how to interact with each other will give us a basis upon which we can go forward and move hopefully very quickly to salvage what we can in the event of a complex catastrophe. thank you. >> and admiral
. it was a display of competence. and it gives us confidence that not only is the military going to help us if we have a problem here, but the military is able to do its job of protecting our national security with confidence. it's wonderful to see confidence on display. i was asking myself as i listened to the panel today and i'm working with mike and leslie on the program, what kind of words would describe what we're doing? well, certainly impressive is one. reassuring is one, that we see what's going on, the planning, the capabilities. i think another is to underline the importance and then this panel in particular they underline t the importance of looking on this as a building operation. each year has been a little better than the year before or different. if that's been iterative or a plus [speaker not understood]. somebody asked if we could keep this going. may i remind you it's been going for 31 years. we've had this last two years that have been the most impressive iteration, but it's been going for a long while. let me try to sort of summarize it by using an image. how many of you have
-day humanitarian assistance disaster relief. we used it as an accreditation not only for some of our adaptive force packages, but more importantly to the state of hawaii to allow them to get an accreditation that they needed for 13 of their hospitals where we set up on ford island, those familiar with the oahu island geography, we utilized ford island and we had a scenario where there was an earthquake with a resultant tsunami and mass casualties along with the destruction that goes with it to the road infrastructure and communication. and, so, we were able to parlay, if you will, this opportunity to leverage off our international partners. we had seven nations that out of the 22 that actually participated in the hadr, and there were probably also 19 of the 22 that at least observed. but there were 7 of us that actually participated. and we were able to share with each other those things that worked, those things that don't work. it's interesting because one of the things that we work very hard on was one of the things that the first panel this morning talked about, and that was communication. and
participation from city, civilian agencies from all around the region and all of us our fabulous united states military, the coast guard has been fabulous in providing assets to protect everybody out on the bay. it is one heck of a logistics program to get this whole program started and here we are the culmination of nearly a year of planning. we've had exercises, we've had lots of meetings down in san francisco up at the marines memorial, this is a fabulous program, we had a great medical exchange yesterday. senior leaders seminar third year in a row has gotten a lot of attention. we have a lot of new people who haven't been here for the past couple years, we have a lot of people who have been here for the last 3 years, and one of the major consistent people who has been behind this whole program is the chairman of the san francisco fleet week association, general -- major general mike myers who i'm going to ask to come up and make is remarks. >> thank you, lewis. when i accepted the responsibilities for organizing san francisco's fleet week, the guidance given to me by our honorary co-c
strong, and i'll use that word a little bit more loosely and say competent. you must be able to do things. so, if you take that image and you have objectives on the one talon and capability on the other, and you marry them together, that's what we in the united states have been doing, particularly since the end of world war ii. then there we were having propelled the three worlds to victory. the other of us having seen we had an aggressive adversary on our hands and looking back what a horrible last century or so, we had to do better. and we did it by this iteration of objectives and capabilities. and we put together what has amounted to a global economic and security commons from which we all have benefited and continue to benefit. [speaker not understood]. so, we have to keep working at it. and i think the things that have been talked about here are very much in the line of keeping [speaker not understood]. niche a was mentioned this morning. that was a fantastic piece of work by the navy. it turned around the attitudes of niche a toward the united states. it was a the kind of building
to the party and help us with, not only how we can interact with the military, but also we say to ourselves, it's also up to us to do everything we can for ourselves. we're not kind of an outfit, it's easier for them to collaborate with us. so, all of these things are important to us as we have these exercises. so, i say this is a very worthwhile enterprise that will keep going. i tip my hat to my friend mike who really has been leading us in these efforts. and now i say as also the slogan, i guess you call it this morning, maybe it's what the navy says. i think it's a very good phrase. a global force for good. that's what we've been practicing, a global force for good. thank you. (applause) >> thank you, sir. thank you. thank you very much, sir. (applause) >> and for all of you, tomorrow we're going to have the former secretary defense william perry speak. and the final speaker tomorrow will be the commander of north com, it will be the first time the northern command... >> ladies and gentlemen, welcome to day two of the senior leader seminar for san francisco fleet week 2012. we had a great d
that i clearly should have been using and didn't even know existed, literally within the first 15 minutes of the meeting. ss things like street safety, sidewalk safety scores and quality scores so we could wrap people around places. * route people around places. really unbelievable. we availed ourselves of resources going forward. we had the same -- like any data set, you find great things about it. then there's missing values or is thisxtion that got auto populated. we fixed a lot of things. we fixed a lot of gps coordinates. we would love the ability to post that back up * . even if you're not crowd sourcing new things, you can definitely crowd source quality of a data set that way. >> yeah, it's been a really great experience working with 100 plus and motion loft. just to respond, i think that this is a whole new opportunity actually what you're talking about. in addition to reaching out to the private sector to generate more data sets as you just mentioned, there's also the opportunity to have better data sets from the work that you've done, scrubbing them and harmonizing them. i thi
and gentlemen, the fire boat phoenix. long may she serve san francisco. next is line is the u.s. navy guided missile destroyer, the u.s.s. rebel. equipped with the aegis combat system. it was commissioned in 2002 and deployed last year from san diego as part of the ronald reagan strike group. it was one of first ships to provide humanitarian assistance following the earthquake and tsunami in japan. the first responder, the rebel embarked navy helicopters surveyed the coast line to provide an aerial perspective for the damage to other ships for relief efforts. after hearing first hand from survivors, the crew volunteered to provide assistance. during deployment also conducted counter piracy patrol to enforce exclusive zones in the region. should ship's names sake, edward rebel served in the revolutionary war and searched in a bold complain against pirates and helped shape the fighting spirit that has been characteristic of the u.s. navy. the u.s.s. rebel is the sixth ship to bare the next time. there's 9217 tons and can sail in excess of 30 knots. there's 30 officers and 270 enlisted personne
's a technical term and it's used in a lot of different ways, but this is organic sewage sludge. basically what it is is, oh, maybe things that come out of your garbage disposal, things that are fecal in nature. it's sludge left in the water after the primary treatment, then we blend those two over and send them over to digestion. this building is built to replace tanks here that were so odoriferous they would curl your hair. we built this as an interim process. >> is there a coagulant introduced somewhere in the middle of this? . >> this coagulant brings solids together and lets the water run through. that gives us more time in the digestion process, more time to reduce the amount of solids. these are the biggest ones in the world, like we always like to do in san francisco. they are 4 meter, there's none like it in the world. >> really? wow. >> three meters, usually. we got the biggest, if not the best. so here we are. look at that baby hum. river of sludge. >> one of the things is we use bacteria that's common in our own guts to create this reduction. it's like an extra digestion. one of the
, the streets, cars, we have this oasis of a natural environment. it reminds us of what san francisco initially was. >> this is a section for dogs and plenty of parking. transit is available to get you there easily. and the part is ada -- park is ada accessible. there is also a natural lake. this is your chance to stroll and let the kids run free. it also has many birds to watch. it is the place to find some solitude from the city and appreciate what you share with a wonderful breath of fresh air. , an experienced this park and enjoy the peoples, picnics, and sunshine. this is a lovely place to take a stroll with your loved one hand in hand. located in the middle of pacific heights on top of a hill, lafayette park offers a great square a of a peaceful beauty. large trees border greenery. it features tables and benches, a playground, restaurants, and tennis courts. there are plenty of areas for football, frisbee, and picnics. it is very much a couple's part and there are a multitude of experiences you can have together. bring your dog and watch the mean go with the community or just picnic at o
and appreciation on their part that those of us in the military uniform were not showing up to be large and in charge, but that we were showing up to be supporting of their supported mission. so, that was kind of an eye opener to me, that that understanding wasn't there, you know, readily apparent. and, so, i think it served each and every one of us well and will continue to do that, to understand that that is exactly what the u.s. military is doing when we respond to a disaster. we are there to support. we are supporting and not the supported commander. >> i think one of the things that was a revelation this year, as we've had a chance to do more, i think there is a discovery of how much more really needs to be done. i'm not sure if we quite know yet collectively what we do not yet know in terms of what will be necessary to have an effective response. the comments that we have and the work that we've done over the last couple of months of putting the pieces together just get the lcac ashore, the helicopterses in to conduct an exercise up here last summer reveals that there's a lot more
and the resources that we would have available to us in the event of a large-scale emergency. my hat is off to all of you with just how well you've planned, your multitude capabilities, and as secretary schultz said i'll take a note from his confidence of display. to see how you set up in an hour a field hospital to take care of patients, not run of the mill patients, but critically wounded patients. we were so impressed. i think a couple other words the secretary used were impressive and reassuring. that's what it's about, forming partnerships. so, i'm very proud to be not only to be honoring and celebrating our military, but to be partnering once again in cross training. happy to report that a little later today aboard the uss macon, we're learning the best. firefighting below the deck, members on the flight deck learning about aircraft rescue, firefighting. similarly, and i won't be able to stay the whole day today because soon i'll be headed over to treasure island, a former navy firefighting school, we'll have that facility about 14 years and we'll be welcoming 40 members from the u.s. marine
. for us today, showing that recreating that path way if you will, it's a huge complement to the city for the way that you have always embraced our returning sailors, marines and coast guardsman that served forward and are finally coming home again. the parade of ships is a visible display of a partnership between the bay area and the sea services that has been strengthened. just this week, we brought together military leaders, local and state leaders and industry to discuss something that is important to all of us. when the next natural disaster or crisis takes place on our home ground, assembling the team that's going to take care of that has been a wonderful thing. we can't imagine where we would be had we not conducted these senior leadership conferences the last couple years. building partnerships is something we consider important to our nation and the service in particular. as i mentioned last evening, just this last summer, we conducted the world's largest maritime exercise. rim of the pacific and the state of hawaii in their operating areas. it brought together 22 nations to
Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)